Sunday, October 1, 2017

End of the Month Favorites - September

Loree at Danger Garden has a monthly meme called "End of the Month Favorites" and while I am two days late, I am joining in. Plus, it has been ages since I've completed a blog post. :o

Fall is my favorite time of year and I have been doing lots of happy dances lately because it has started raining again. There are lots of plants perking up to the moisture and here are some of my faves for September.

Cosmos 'Redcrest' - one of the few annuals I grow successfully from seed. I get this one from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds and I just love it.

Cuphea 'Strybing Sunset' - overwintered last year in our garage. I am debating whether or not I should leave it in the ground this year.
 
Euphorbia myrsinites (Myrtle Spurge) - doing great in a dry, raised bed in full sun.

Fuchsia 'Cardinal' - I read that this one can get about six feet tall! It has not grown much but the blooms are spectacular.

It is always rewarding when a plant does what you want it to do - Geranium 'Rozanne'

Hellebore 'Merlin' - the first one I have planted and I just got it in the ground a few weeks ago. I love the dark foliage on this one.

I am love with my Lemon Eucalyptis (Corymbia citriodora) - this has to be the most potent lemon fragrance around. It puts Lemon Verbena to shame! I am hoping I can overwinter this.

Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Golden Angel' (Japanese Shrub Mint) really lights up dark areas.

One of my favorite shrubs in Alabama was Sweet Olive (Osmanthus fragrans). I have not been able to locate it here. The one that is widely available is Osmathus heterophyllus 'Goshiki'. It has holly-like leaves with beautiful coloring. I haven't seen a bloom yet.

Pinus strobus "Mini-Twists' - I saw it in the window and just had to have it. It was actually looking pretty ragged at the nursery but it has improved since I have planted it.
The soft needles on this one are incredible.

Sumac 'Tiger Eyes', Michael's favorite. I planted it in the pot with the hole cut out of the bottom in fear of it spreading. I am considering moving it to the front garden over the winter.

I have went nuts over Asters and have bought every variety at Yard N' Garden since working there. This one is the standout right now - 'Purple Dome'

I know buddleias get a bad rap here but this one seems to be very well-behaved and it is so beautiful. It has the unfortunate name of 'Buzz Hot Raspberry'.
Hydrangea quercifolia 'Ruby Slippers' starting to change colors.

Although the Mandevilla has still not reached the top of the mailbox and draped over it like I hoped it would, I include it because every neighbor has stopped and asked what it is and we have seen people stop and take photos of it.


Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy

14 comments:

  1. Ah, you're one of those rain lovers! Great photo of the Euphorbia myrsinites, I so enjoyed seeing your garden in person and I'm bummed I missed spotting the Agaves!

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  2. Thank you for sharing all your lovely blooms and foliage. I'm deeply envious of your rain drops - we are getting pretty dry again in Alabama but at least it is finally cooling down. That's a smart way to plant 'Tiger Eyes' sumac. I hope it works. I, too, would be afraid of finding it coming up all over my yard. I have enough of those kinds of things already.

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  3. These are some wonderful favorites! I like that orange Cosmos, I might just track that down from Baker Creek.

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  4. The bloomers are great for September. Beware of Hellebores. They can become addictive.

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  5. That aster 'Purple Dome' is incredible. I must find one and try it out down here. I love asters but they are difficult down here.

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  6. Looks great! I love rain pictures. All the colors seem to pop and the overcast skys make it so much easier to get fabulous pictures.

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  7. I've grown 'Purple Dome' aster and 'Rozanne' geranium, but yours look soooooooooooo much better than ours did. I guess they like conditions better out there? Or maybe you irrigate more? (I think you said you water a lot in the summer, whereas I rarely give plants supplemental water beyond their first year in the garden, if that.)

    'Goshiki' false holly (Osmanthus heterophyllus) has done well here in Tennessee in both full sun and partial shade. I've grown it for a couple of years and have not seen any flowers yet either, but perhaps it needs to be a bit older to bloom?

    Amazing to see an oakleaf hydrangea just *starting* to turn to pink now! Does yours flower all summer? Or does it just start blooming in autumn? As I'm sure you probably recall from your years gardening in the oakleaf's native Alabama climate, it tends to bloom late spring here and then quickly turn pink then tan by early summer. It's like hopping in a time machine to see it changing colors now! :)

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  8. I bought that 'Golden angel' as well . I had to give it plenty of water when it was hot or it really sulked ! A least it's near the hose .

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  9. Cosmos 'Redcrest' is beautiful, especially against the blood grass in the background. I think I'll try some seeds next year. Geranium 'Rozanne' looks great; a wonderful vignette with the plant behind it, which I don't recognize. And finally the Aster: I'm glad I'm not the only one to be enamored with it: Can one ever have enough purple in the fall garden?

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  10. I particularly enjoy reading garden blogs from the Pacific Northwest because you seem to have the most unique plants. Granted, some of that might have to do with your job at a nursery, but still!

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  11. So many great plants, and so beautifully photographed. Enjoyed them all, thanks!

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  12. All beautiful but that first photo really gets my juices flowing. Hated to miss the swap at your place...family stuff stepped in at the last minute. I'm on the lookout for E. myrsinitis.

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  13. So much glorious color to love. That first picture with the orange cosmos and red grass is an eye catcher. Autumn beauty is everywhere in your garden.

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