Friday, October 4, 2013

October Fireworks


The cooler temperatures and rain is bringing on the fall flowers. One of my favorites is Lycoris radiata (aka Red Spider Lily) which magically appears in late September out of nowhere. This is related to the pink Magic Lily ("Naked Ladies") that appear earlier in late July. They remind me of sparklers.

Red Spider Lily (Lycoris radiata)  
Red Spider Lily (Lycoris radiata)

Cestrum "Orange Peel" has been a prolific bloomer all summer. This plant was recommended to me by Pam Harper. I purchased this at Plant Delights nursery on our vacation last year. It is truly a great plant, standing about 6 ft. tall and great blooms.
Another plant purchased on that trip at the same nursery - Sissingia "Scarlet O'Hara", this one recommended by Plant Delights owner Tony Avent.

Plume Poppy (Macleaya cordata) and Sedum "Autumn Joy"
Sedum "Autumn Joy" blooms next to the leaves of Plume Poppy (Macleaya cordata)

Geranium
Geranium

Euphorbia "Diamond Frost"
Euphorbia "Diamond Frost"

Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha)
One of my favorite fall perennials - Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha)

impatiens-euphorbia-diamond-frost
Impatiens and Euphorbia "Diamond Frost"

Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)
No flowers but equally impressive is Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)

Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) and Hydrangea "Twist and Shout"
Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) with Hydrangea "Twist n' Shout"

Lantana "Caprice"
Lantana "Caprice"
Abelia "Frances Mason"
Abelia "Frances Mason"

Acuba and Goldenrod
Acuba and Goldenrod (Solidago "Fireworks")

Confederate Rose
Confederate Rose (Hibiscus mutabilis) - Michael and I always admire these every year when we go to the beach. It seems everybody grows them in south Alabama and north Florida. They are marginally hardy here. This one has survived several winters and this is the first year it has bloomed. It is a giant and stands 10 ft. in the air with the blooms at the very top.

Hardy Orange (Poncirus Trifoliata) and Plume Poppy (Macleaya cordata)
Hardy Orange (Poncirus trifoliata) and Plume Poppy (Macleaya cordata)
Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy

15 comments:

  1. What a beautiful garden you have. The plume poppy worries me. I finally managed to get rid of it all - it was so invasive. A terrific thug!

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  2. I planted mine in pots and put them in the ground. They haven't been too bad. Occasionally I will find one that has popped up elsewhere but it is easy to pull up.

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  3. The spider lilies are so bright and pretty! They do look like little explosions.

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  4. Ah, the Confederate Rose is everywhere on the Gulf Coast because it's very happy = hard to control in that climate!

    Now that I've moved up to the top of Alabama, you give me hope that I could have a polite CR, and skip wrestling with its thorny whips several times a year to keep it where I want it.

    ( I do love a CR - it's one of those childhood memory plants for me. I wish I had noticed then whether my piano teacher/neighbor had had to regularly beat her giant one into submission in her garden outside of Atlanta.)

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  5. Magpi, I see them growing more and more in this area. Of course we've had many years of mild winters. I would suggest putting it in a south-facing location.

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  6. I much prefer the red lycoris to pink ones... Gorgeous! All of your photos are outstanding today...Larry

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  7. For me, lilies are always number 1. :)
    Everything looks great though.

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  8. I love that first photo where it looks like the Spider Lilies are blooms from the hosta! If only....

    Also your Plume Poppies are gorgeous, I wish I knew why mine never look that good.

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  9. Wow, that red lady is gorgeous. I have never seen one other than in pictures. I have planted it but they must not like it here because they have never come up. The Confederate rose is one I have never seen either. It is a beauty. I love the different leaves it has too. You have a lot blooming now.

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  10. I am glad to see other gardeners are catching on to Cestrum. Isn't it a blooming machine, and it laughs at heat and drought.

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  11. Where can I get some Red Spider Lilies? I've seen them in people's yards but never at a nursery.

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  12. Where can I get some Red Spider Lilies? I've seen them in people's yards but never at a nursery.

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  13. Love your garden. The Lycoris radiata is stunning, how it grows through the Hosta leafs. The blue pot behind the Northern Sea Oats really make the grass pop. You have a great eye for color and texture combinations. You'll be my inspiration for something new in my own garden. (I too find dirt therapeutic)

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  14. Froginablender, you can find them on Ebay or here is a nursery source - http://www.southernbulbs.com/

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