May Days

pan-garden


The month of May has flown by in a flash. We have had a record-breaking dry May which makes me sad. I cannot remember the last time we had a good rain but the garden looks pretty lush nevertheless. The Pan Garden (above) has not filled in yet and I keep tinkering with the planting, moving things around and replacing others. Since this photo was taken, Michael pulled out the edging and buried it deeper.

It looks so much better... 


pangarden2



The major project - the terracing of the slope (below) - is finally drawing to a close. I think one or two more loads of rocks will complete it. The middle set of steps will be planted in grass, or at least that it my current plan. I think there is enough going on in the side beds and the eye needs a place to rest. 


steps

Standing at the top set of steps (at the far right in the above photo) gives this view - a sense of accomplishment - 


terraced-garden

Over on the opposite side is our only shady spot and we refer to as the woodland path -


woodland-path

About a month ago, we moved the arbor from the vegetable garden area to the woodland path. I think it looks much better here and I have other plans for the vegetable garden (I plan to replace it).



And today, we finished spreading the gravel for the wide pathway at the bottom of the slope - 


gravel

A wider shot of the entire area - 

gravel-2



I continue to add trees - the last one planted is this weeping Redbud. The poor apple tree still partially stands. I continue to whittle away at it. It gives us some valuable shade so I do not want to take it all down yet. It is a mess though. 


redbud


mutabalis


The rose 'Mutabalis' has been spectacular this year. It is over 6 feet tall! I really do not like it paired with the Jerusalem Sage on the right but for now, it will have to stay. The next major project will be a wall to create a separate room for the Pan garden. I hope to do that next winter. The work never ends around here!

Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy

Comments

  1. The work may never end but the results are dramatic. You have turned this yard into a beautiful garden. I have so enjoyed seeing the transformation. Just WOW.

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  2. P.S. When I say 'you' I mean You and Michael. I know he has helped tremendously. :)

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    Replies
    1. He is doing a tremendous amount of work and he keeps it weeded. It would be a huge mess if I had to do it all because my work schedule is pretty full right now.

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  3. Your garden is looking fabulous ! You've done so much since last year . I love your woodland path .

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    1. And we are pretty much out of places to plant things there. Sigh!

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  4. Your garden looks wonderful! All your hard work is paying off. It's true, the work never stops with a garden.

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    1. It truly does not. And when you think you have it finished, you start re-doing it.

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  5. Oh Phillip, your garden looks amazing. All that hard work has transformed the space into something really special!

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  6. So beautiful! You've done so much work, made so many good changes in the little time you've been on this property. I especially like the statue and the Pan garaden (very original) and all the steps with plantings.

    I know where all your good weather went. Down here. We are having best May weather we've seen in years, cloudy days, cool nights) and it is making the flowers last a long time.

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  7. I'm so glad to see a few overview shots of your garden, it looks amazing. I wonder how you'll mow the grass on the center steps. It could be a challenge.

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    1. Yeah, that is what Michael says. Maybe a reel mower or weed eater? Not sure, but perhaps I should think more on this.

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    2. I found success with wooly thyme: good coverage and no mowing.

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  8. Yes, I don't think I would put grass on the steps, but then I like removing grass much better than planting it. I think you do, too? Corsican mint used to be a popular ground cover, though it often died out on me. I remember what I think was called Kenilworth ivy in my Portland back yard - it was easy to pull but it did spread. It was very light and airy - not dense like regular ivy. I'm so glad you showed these areas in the back yard - I've been keeping my fingers crossed that they would show up soon in a post. Do you have 3 sets of steps? It all looks magnificent. Great job, Phillip!

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  9. Looks awesome! Did you build the gravel patio yourselves? I'm thinking to replace the (slowly decaying) wood deck out back with a gravel patio, but haven't the faintest idea how/where to begin...

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    1. It is actually just a pathway covered with gravel. :)

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    2. Hm. At risk of revealing my ignorance (too late?) do you mean it was originally just a dirt pathway and then you covered it in gravel? If so, did you do any prep work to the pathway (e.g., grading or leveling) or did you literally just pour some gravel on top and rake it level? And how deep is the gravel? (Yep, I'm an ignoramus when it comes to gravel paths and patios!)

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    3. It was just lawn at the bottom of the slope. We removed the grass, leveled it up and then covered it with gravel. Right now it is only about 1-2 inches thick. We keep borrowing it to put in other places and at the bottom of pots. I will probably add more to it over time.

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    4. Thank you for diminishing my ignorance a little, Phillip! :)

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  10. it is amazing how far you have come with your garden in such a short time! I wish I had you energy and ability. Hopefully I'm done with foot and knee aliments so I can get really busy in my garden. Love seeing what all ya'll have done! Hugs

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    1. Thank you Carol. I know I don't have the energy that I used to have!

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