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Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Blankets of snow



What? Snow in September? Not quite, but Sweet Autumn Clematis (Clematis ternifolia) reminds me of it as drapes over hedges and mailboxes across town. It always pops up in our garden unannounced and usually in unwelcome places. For example, the hedge in the above photo runs along the street and encloses a tiny vegetable garden. I always see the clematis scampering about it during the summer and I usually just yank it out since this hedge has to be trimmed about every four or five weeks. I don't know how it escaped me this year but when it started to bloom, it was too pretty to pull it out.



The vines are covered with these tiny star-shaped flowers and will reach distances of 20-30 feet if given the opportunity. It thrives here, in sun or shade, and is very drought tolerant. I'm always digging up seedlings and sharing them. It grows fast and can easily cover an arbor or gazebo in a season. It can be cut back all the way to the ground in the fall or the following spring.



In addition to a beautiful show, the vine has an intoxicating sweet smell!

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13 comments:

  1. I was going to warn you but you already know it's charms and problems! It is really beautiful...I haven't any in bloom this year, but still there are seedlings everywhere!

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  2. I've never had this re-seed so it must be a climate issue. It does look like a dusting of snow but that brings snow to mind and I just can't think of that right now!

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  3. My Autumn Clematis doesn't seed itself either. I love the way it 'snows' this time of year. Yours looks lovely in the hedge.

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  4. It's a nice looking plant too bad it can be problematic. I was given one in the spring but never planted it, more out of laziness than anything else!

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  5. I think it looks kind of neat in the hedge. Snow is a good comparison.

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  6. Beautiful, one of my favorites. I wish mine did a better job of seeding itself. I have one growing in an impossible spot--a seam between sidewalk and garage. I fear it isn't doing well and I will never be able to get another to grow there.
    Marnie

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  7. I saw lots of this "snow" while in TN last weekend. I dont see much of it around here in GA. Hum, wonder why...?... Maybe that invasive issue..

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  8. It's one of my favorites. Mine does self-seed, but pretty discreetly--I never get more than I can find homes for. One did grow up through a camellia this year--I'm letting it bloom and then I'll move it in the spring. The scent is wonderful.

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  9. Dee/reddirtramblingsSeptember 6, 2008 at 6:07 PM

    Me too, Phillip. I just wrote about it a few days ago. It is kind of a nightmare, but so pretty when it blooms.~~Dee

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  10. I love this vine. Mine is blooming profusely, too. It grows wild in the woods around here and is such a wonderful sign of early fall. Reminds me of confederate jasmine which blooms in the spring.

    Jan
    Always Growing

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  11. Since I've been reading garden blogs, I've learned this is one of those plants that people grow everywhere but not so much in California. I see it for sale now and then, but I've never seen it in an actual garden. Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is the other one I read a lot about this time of year.

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  12. It is too pretty to pull out. And fragrance to boot!

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  13. Just Betiful!
    Thanks for a werry nice blog!
    I vill be back!
    Linda

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