Thursday, June 17, 2010

Hydrangea "Amethyst"



Here is another hydrangea that would be on my top 10 list. It is a compact grower, no taller than 3 feet and wide, with large, tight blooms. Most books say that the flower color is pale pink to violet but in our garden, it is a bright robin's egg blue. It is in a bed lined with bricks and sided by concrete steps. I don't know if that affects the bloom color but I suspect it does. The flowers have white centers in the early stag of blooming and the sepals are serrated.









Text and photos by Phillip Oliver, Dirt Therapy

11 comments:

  1. That is a beautiful hydrangea. I love the deep blue.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The color is beautiful. Nice, big blooms on a relatively compact plant.
    Marnie

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very nice specimen. I know that aluminum is necessary in the soil to produce blue pigment.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I really like these blue hydrangea. I did however see a really tacky display of them which left a bad taste in my mouth. I'm trying to get over it, but it's going to take some time.

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a sweet plant. It looks like a baby Niko blue.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It is a beauty dress in its blue. The compact shrub makes it very appealing for small gardens.

    ReplyDelete
  7. You are torturing me with these gorgeous hydrangea blooms and vignettes! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very nice! I sure with I had more shady spaces for hydrangeas like that. Of course then I'd be providing a deer buffet...

    ReplyDelete
  9. You sure have the touch with the Hydrangeas. The frilly petals are so pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The concrete steps would add alkalinity to the soil which would turn the blooms pink. That is our problem in So. Cal. with highly alkaline water, we can't get those beautiful blue bloom like you do. It is lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Your hydrangea looks perfect by the steps and birdbath. I like hydrangeas planted along a path, so I can enjoy the blossoms close-up as I walk past. I am planning to add more hydrangeas to a path which already has several varieties. I will keep this one in mind!

    ReplyDelete