Tuesday, September 15, 2009

September Bloom Day

We've had nice temperatures but it is muggy and uncomfortable outside. The mosquitoes are out in full force! Here is what is blooming in the mid-September garden:

First, a few roses -




"Hermosa"
"Lyda Rose"
"Gartendirektor Otto Linne"
"Caldwell Pink"
Purslane, which I prefer over Portulaca
Sedum, more than likely "Autumn Joy"
Coleus
Begonia "Bonfire"
Hardy Orange (Poncirus Trifoliata)
Chenille Plant (Acalypha hispida)
Lycoris radiata
Mexican Sage (Salvia leucantha)
Fallopia japonica 'Crimson Beauty' (aka Japanese Knotweed, Mexican Bamboo)

Many thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens who started Bloom Day. To see more blooms, visit her blog.


26 comments:

  1. Phillip, your photos are knockouts! Thanks for sharing your beautiful images.

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  2. Beautiful September blooms, Phillip. We're having very warm, dry September days here in Chicago as well.

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  3. All your photos are excellent, but the one of Bonfire is exquisite.

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  4. As always, your roses are stunning. Love these photos.

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  5. Your pictures are always so great, I really love the roses!! I'd love to be able to grow oranges here!

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  6. Hi Phillip, this is the first time I visit your blog and I'm so impressed. You are a true master with the camera! They are excellent all of them...OK most of them anyway. The second rose picure is my favorit both the bloom and the shot.Keep up the good work./TYRA

    THE GREENHOUSE IN TYRA'S GARDEN

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  7. Lyda Rose and the hardy Orange are my favourites.

    I'm not going to say how good your photos are as I always say that.

    Oh go on then, beautiful photos as ever.

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  8. Your Hermosa looks like it is resting after a long hot summer. I believe your mystery plant is Polygonum cuspidatum aka Japanese Knotweed, Mexican Bamboo. Keep your eye on it and your spade near. Happy GBBD!

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  9. Stunning photos Phillip! Your hardy orange is gorgeous and I love everything about the photo of your Begonia Bonfire. Lovely post and I trust your talk went well. Carol

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  10. Your photos are fantastic! Love these blooms! I've been surrounded by tropical flowers-which are great, don't get me wrong- but it's fun to return to see the "traditional Southern" ones too.

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  11. That mystery plant is also known as Fallopia japonica. Some varieties have white flowers and others variegated foliage (white and green).

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  12. This is my first visit to your blog and your photos are gorgeous. I love your roses, which are probably too tender for me, but I love looking at all roses. And that Bonfire begonia is a stunner. If that mystery plant is Fallopia japonica, which I thought of too, in our area we call our white flowered variety Japanese knotweed and it is so invasive that it is all along our roadsides and wetlands. Most people have given up trying to eradicate it. Just about impossible.

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  13. Hi Phillip, your roses are lovely and the Lycoris radiata is unusual and so vivid. I miss not having roses. The Japanese beetles are still here so there won't be a fall flush. It makes me so sad but I may as well remove all the rose bushes except the early spring bloomers.
    Marnie

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  14. I agree with other commenters that you take the most alluring photos of your gorgeous plants. I love all your Roses, but what struck me the most is your Coleus. I can see I've abused my by keeping it in too small a container.

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  15. OOoooooo I love that Lyda rose. All of your blooms look so pretty. I have tried to grow a chenille plant several times. I don't know if our growing season isn't long enough or if I just didn't get it where it liked to be. I think they are so interesting. I always want to touch the blooms. Happy GBBD.

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  16. Phillip, It really has been muggy and buggy. Thank you for going out there to capture these beautiful images for us. They are lovely. gail

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  17. Your roses are beautiful. I'm drooling over your Lyda Rose. What a gorgeous flower.

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  18. I really do think you need to learn to grow things. It looks pitiful. Oh--it looks awesome and I agree about the weather--just awful with mosquitos buzzing in your ears and all. We did enjoy a good summer and it was welcome after the awful drought of years past.

    About the dwarf buddleia on my site---I will have to order one as I could not find them around here. The one I have was sent to me by PW. I can't convince the garden centers around here that they need to carry more than a hand full.

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  19. Exquisite photos! Good luck with that "pink bamboo"! It could be one of any number of cultivars (or straight species), but it's pretty consistently invasive! I have it and love the look late in the season, but you need to be ok letting it just do it's thing and pull out seedlings that pop up where you don't want them!

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  20. You certainly have a garden full of beautiful things to look at....a little bug spray is worth it this time of year. The bugs are just as bed for us in Charleston this time of year. I scratch where you do too!

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  21. I'm going to go crazy if you keep showing that fabulous begonia! Must have one... Love your roses as usual. It looks like they're getting ready for a fall burst just judging by the intense colors. I hope so!

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  22. Fantastic photos! My gardens need more roses.

    I'm loving Lyda Rose -- a simple rose, yet complex on it's own.

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  23. Phillip, I just found your blog, very ,very nice! Your photos are great, and those roses....I'm sure you know of Griffith Bucks hardy hybrids? (Heirloom Roses), fantastic corny names, and real garden performance as well-I love their own root, virus free stock! I'll be checking in again! Brian

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  24. Nice to meet you.

    I was going to paste the link without permission because I had very felt the interest for your blog.

    Please link me with the blog if it is good.

    URL:http://hiro-anniversary.blogspot.com/

    E-mail:h-mori@ibs-office.com

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  25. Hi Phillip, your roses all are wonderful, but Lyda is my favorite. I have a seed grown one that looks similar, very small and sweet, called Angel Wings. Has that polygonum, fallopia thing been changed to perscicaria? I can't keep up with these name changes anymore.
    Frances

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  26. The very first photo of the rose lying against the stone is spectacular, my dear! As I said before, you've quite the eye for catching a good photo ;0)

    --Jamie

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